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I have been selected to produce and showcase new art work as part of The Barbican Centre, London's Creative Learning / Open Lab initiative. Details to follow 

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You are warmly invited to:
SIGHT (UN)SPECIFIC




New works by Lee Campbell, Rory Flynn, Adrian Lee and Carali McCall + artist discussion

http://www.metalculture.com/event/sight-unspecific-chalkwell-hall/

Saturday 22nd October 2016    
16.00-18.00  

This event curated by Dr. Lee Campbell presents a combination of art performance, performative lecture and reflective discussion. It aims to contribute to an area of contemporary art practice relating to how practitioners have not only made works that go beyond pure visual sensation and incorporate, or are wholly dedicated to non-visual aspects, often prioritising the haptic, orality, sound elements and other sensory components (Coles, 1984; Marks, 2002; Paterson, 2007), but how practitioners have deployed the  concept of visual impairment and blindness as informing the work’s form and content, and by doing so generate public pedagogy of what it may mean to experience interrupted/removal of sight.

The event, extending Campbell’s recent event You Don’t Need Eyes To See, You Need Vision in London aims to add to the rich contextual history of artworks made by artists and performers who challenge aspects of visuality within their practice. For example, Artur Zmijewski’s work Blindly at Tate Modern, London in 2014 explored what it means to imagine and represent without relying on the sense of sight. In Sight (Un)Specific, Campbell, Flynn, Lee and McCall attempt to extend existing practices and produce creative responses that make positive usage of visual deprivation as a means to think more deeply about how we perceive the operations of certain concepts in the world. Furthermore, this quartet attempts to test the viewer’s understanding of how we may theorise, articulate and demonstrate what may be classed as a dominance of visuality over other senses (Jay, 1993; Crary, 2000) and provoke discussion as to what it might mean to live in a society, which Martin Jay has described as ‘occularcentric’ or ‘dominated’ by vision (1993:3). Works made as part of this event will be reflected upon and disseminated during a conference paper that Campbell, Lee and McCall will give as part of The Future of the Document: documenting performance, Interdisciplinary Symposium: Monday 31st October 2016, at City, University of London.


For further information: LCampbell@lincoln.ac.uk


The event is free to attend. This event contains, at times, low levels of lighting. The event will be documented using video and still photography.


THE FUTURE OF THE DOCUMENT Documenting Performance symposium



https://documentingperformance.wordpress.com/

City University, London, 31st October 2016

I will be presenting a co-paper with Carali McCall and Adrian Lee. 


'The Classroom Observer: Unwanted Interruption or Welcome Witness?'
by Dr Lee Campbell 

has now been published on ETE: Exploration Through Education
and can be accessed online here: 

Abstract

For many teachers, classroom observation can be a painful interruption/intrusion (Wragg, 1994:15) in the flow of a lesson’s delivery in terms of facilitating a meaningful, creative and enjoyable learning environment that is supportive to both learner and teacher. Whilst I acknowledge that observation can be a daunting experience, eliciting fear and dread at having someone, an ‘intruder’ (Minton, 2005:18) who is not normally part of the audience, watch and scrutinise an individual’s teaching style (O’Leary, 2014:62), I argue for the positive promotion of classroom observation (Double and Martin, 1998) and stress the benefits of ‘develop[ing] personal skills of evaluation and self-appraisal’ (1998:162). The discussion of an observed teaching session that I gave to a group of first year Fine Art undergraduates at Loughborough University in 2015 whose overall purpose/aim of the session was to familiarise students with core issues relating to the usage of sketchbooks as a common staple within contemporary art practice, helps to support my argument that the positive aspects of classroom peer observation (as a live process) outweigh the negatives and can in fact be supportive in providing an opportunity for teachers to realise or reinforce (O’Leary, 2014:62) the strengths in what they are doing. This is in addition to providing a window for the teacher to gain critical constructive feedback from often a more experienced colleague, who has probably at many points during their own teaching career, experienced similar moments of anxiety, positivity and reflection. The danger and the unanticipated events that ‘liveness’ can throw up is half the excitement of teaching. Indeed, ‘coping with the unexpected is an important part of successful teaching’ (Race, 2009:20).

References

Double, Jeremy, and Martin, A, Graham, 1998. Developing Higher Education Teaching Skills Through Peer Observation and Collaborative Reflection in Innovations in Education & Training International, 35:2, 161-170
Minton, David, 2005. Teaching Skills for Further and Adult Education.Thomson Learning
O’Leary, Matthew, 2014. Classroom Observation: A Guide to Effective Observation ofTeaching and Learning. Routledge
Race, Phil, 2009. Using peer observation to enhance teaching. Leeds Met Press

Wragg, Conrad, Edward, 1994. An Introduction to Classroom Observation. Routledge

YOU DON'T NEED EYES TO SEE, YOU NEED VISION



New works by Lee Campbell, Adrian Lee and Carali McCall with 
artist discussion chaired by Aaron McPeake. 

BASEMENT SPACE, THE QUEENS HEAD HOLBORN,64 THEOBALDS ROAD, LONDON, WC1X 8SF

Saturday 3rd September 2016    
16.00-18.00


This event curated by Dr Lee Campbell presents a combination of art performance, performative lecture and reflective discussion. It aims to contribute to an area of contemporary art practice relating to how practitioners have not only made works that go beyond pure visual sensation and incorporate or are wholly dedicated to non-visual aspects, often prioritising the haptic, orality, sound elements and other sensory components (Coles, 1984; Marks, 2002; Paterson, 2007), but how practitioners have deployed the  concept of visual impairment and blindness as informing the work’s form and content and by doing so generate public pedagogy of what it may mean to experience interrupted/removal of sight. The title of the event is a lyric taken from the Faithless song Reverence (1996) and referred to in the context of the event to suggest that visual impairment should not hinder one’s creativity, learning development and personal goals and ambitions.

The event aims to add to the rich contextual history of artworks made by artists and performance makers who challenge aspects of visuality within their practice. For example, Artur Zmijewski’s work Blindly at Tate Modern, London in 2014 explored what it means to imagine and represent without relying on the sense of sight. Campbell, Lee and McCall attempt to extend existing practices and produce creative responses that make positive usage of visual deprivation as a means to think more deeply about how we perceive certain things in the world. Furthermore, the trio attempts to test the viewer’s understanding of how we may theorise, articulate and demonstrate what may be classed as a dominance of visuality over other senses (Jay, 1993; Crary, 2000) and provoke discussion of what it may mean to live in a society, which Martin Jay has described as ‘occularcentric’ or ‘dominated’ by vision (1993:3).

For further information: lee.campbell@arts.ac.uk

Twitter hashtag:  #youdontneedeyestoseeyouneedvision

The event is free to attend. This event contains, at times, low levels of lighting.

Notes on the artists:
Dr Lee Campbell is an artist, curator and academic based in London. His practice plays with the parameters of contemporary art that draw attention to the performative and the participative within an art historical vernacular and seeks to interrogate how we may construct meaning between politics of space and the politics of artist/performer/protagonist articulated through visual and verbal languages. His doctoral thesis ‘Tactics of Interruption: Provoking Participation in Performance Art’ awarded by Loughborough University in 2016 made a contribution to knowledge in participative performance practice and the positive deployment of using interruptive processes; this is in order to provoke participation within the context of Performance Art as well as gain a better understanding of the operations of power relations at play. 

Adrian Lee works in video, performance and sculpture. He explores the material that surrounds us by reworking and re-examining the trappings of our commercial culture. His practice investigates the processes of communication and persuasion used on both domestic and international scales. It appropriates numerous visual and aural languages, re-circulating their symbolic components to disrupt the logic of our assumptions. He reorganises familiar elements from multinational corporate advertising, to vernacular promotional material, via the icons of art history and the rhetoric and actions of those with power and influence. www.adrianlee.info

Dr Carali McCall is a Canadian-born, London UK-based artist; awarded her Ph.D. at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, UAL (thesis title, A Line is a Brea(d)thless Length: introducing the physical act of running as a form of drawing). Her practice addresses how duration, and imposed restrictions on the body can contribute to a greater awareness of what it means to draw. Approaching the body as a tool, she embraces the idea that the artist is not only physically present in the act of drawing, but also brings an experience to something that exceeds the object of art (be it through the body in live performance, video or sound recording, or photograph). www.caralimccall.com

References

Coles, P. (1984). Please Touch: An Evaluation of the 'Please Touch' exhibition at  the British Museum 31st March to 8th May.
Crary, J. (2000). Suspension of Perception: Attention, Spectacle and Modern Culture. Cambridge: MIT.
Jay, M. (1993). Downcast eyes: the denigration of vision in twentieth-century French thought. Berkeley; London: University of California Press.
Marks, U, L. (2002). Touch: Sensuous Theory and Multisensory Media. London: University of Minnesota  Press.


Paterson, M. (2007). The Senses of Touch – Haptics, Affects and Technologies. New York: Berg Publishers. 



INVITED GUEST LECTURE AT SLADE SCHOOL OF FINE ART, UCL 



'TACTICS OF INTERRUPTION'  EVENT AT
TOYNBEE STUDIOS, LONDON 

Toynbee Studios
28 Commercial Street 
London

This event assembled a range of practitioners and thinkers who will explore the potential for inserting interruption into art and performance practice. Extending discussion on the power of interruption, the event included a series of presentations from Lee and other speakers including Fred Meller, Peter Bond, and The Bad Vibes Club (Matthew de Kersaint Giraudeau & Sam Mercer) and a roundtable discussion with Jane Munro and others, and punctuated by ‘interruptive’ performances from Alexander Costello, Rory Flynn, Morrad+McArthur and Johanna Hällsten.



ONLINE JOURNAL ARTICLE


Campbell, Lee, 2016. ‘TECHNOPARTICIPATION: Intermeshing performative pedagogy and interruption’, Body, Space & Technology, Volume 15 / Number 01 Brunel. Published in association with the School of Arts at Brunel University. 


GUEST LECTURE AT UCC, IRELAND 2016 

I gave a paper on performative pedagogy at UCC in May 2016. Abstract below.  To read the full paper see: https://www.academia.edu/25363656/Performative_Pedagogy

An interesting audience response can be found here:



'Provoking Participation: Tactics of Performative Pedagogy'


This talk relates to my usage of performative aspects within pedagogic process and disseminates important aspects of my pedagogic strategy relating to how I apply my knowledge and expertise as an artist of generating performance practice with an emphasis on participation to my classroom. The talk will begin with a reflection upon my experience of working as an EFL teacher in London in the 2000s as being really significant in terms of how I initially structured the form and content of my teaching sessions in order to include performative techniques as methods to provoke learner participation, heighten engagement, nurture creative ability and facilitate learners getting to grips with the target language. I will then explain how I currently use performative pedagogy (with an emphasis on technology) in my teaching practice as the result of me being awarded a Loughborough University Teaching Innovation Award 2015-2016. As part of my discussion, I will share a three-stage teaching process that I have designed. This process - Anticipation, Action, and Analysis – extends an existing model of reflective practice (Rolfe, 2001) and has been described as an ‘original, practical and imaginative way of demonstrating reflective practice’ (Newbold, 2016).
As part of the talk, audience members will have the chance to engage in an interactive element using Textwall.
References.
Newbold, C. Personal communication with the author in 2016.
Rolfe, G. 2001. Critical reflection in nursing and the helping professions: A user’s    guide. Basingstoke: Palgrave
SUMMER LODGE 2015 STUDIO RESIDENT



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